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, that day in boston it was raining and about 51, 52 degrees. and so i was fine as long as i was running but then when i stopped running, my body temperature plunged. and francis just casually treated this event but i think she may have, i don't know if she saved my life but she certainly wrapped me up in lots of blankets and supplied with all kinds of drinks, perhaps good ones as well as bad ones, but whatever you did work. because we're both standing here today. >> if you took a snapshot of the world in the year, let's say 1700, you would see a world in which power was broadly diffused around the world. here in north america there really wasn't much economic or military capabilities, but across the atlantic and across the pacific there was a great deal, and power was roughly equally distributed across five men and real centers of power. the holy roman empire, in europe, the ottoman empire in what is today turkey, the mogul empire, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultu
use on the fbi's most wanted list. is responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew what he was. there's no evidence to suggest that. it's hard to prove negligence but with 6000 doctors from the bin laden compound that has been transited if it was a smoking gun i would be interested in ambassador munter's observation. if there was a smoking gun, our observation on oscar we would not a pointed it out publicly at this point. >> you know, the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no more than they say. [laughter] but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] >> know, there is now evidence that i've seen that there was high level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know, you can be accused of incompetence and this was a domestic issue for the pakistan military and intelligence but that's a different question than we're talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence a new he was there during the time. >> al qaeda tried to kill general musharra
schedule of live coverage of visit our web site at booktv.org. also this weekend is the 36 annual boston international book fair. the fair will feature dozens of exhibitors and display several firsts or special editions of classic novels and books. florida will host the 30 first annual key west literary seminar from january 10th through the 20th. readers can ventured to the festival to sit in on seminars or listen to several lawyers panels. discuss the foundations of writing and creativity. then in february, georgia will host the savannah book festival from the fourteenth to the seventeenth. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area and we will add them to the list. post them to our wall at facebook.com/booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >> this is a booktv live coverage of the 29th annual book fair, a full weekend of mar their panels, call ins and other events. here is the lineup for today. in just a minute dave barry, humor columnist will talk about his book lunatics. >> join be joined by will tracy of the onion, the onion book of no knowledge is their lates
of california and the ninth circuit, and then write out of boston there's the gay and lesbian advocates and defenders and they are bringing what is the most effective case against the so-called defensive marriage act, doma and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or any of those cases and then have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so, is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality and it felt appropriate to write about this and i will tell you a little bit about why intended it for. the book is laid out in the conversation between me and someone who would describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people also tolerance isn't all it's cracked up to be. i have a friend who says that the only thing one should have to tolerate is hemorrhoids. [laughter] perhaps a little overstated. but if you for ever been on the receiving end of tolerance it doesn't feel all that much better than intolerance. if someone is begrudgingly at mending your right to exist it just doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy. so, i imagine a conversations and
the transaction it time in half between washington and new york, as well as between new york and boston. they need to increase speed and updecorate the infrastructure is the ticket to transporting americans in an cost effective and energy efficient matter. we and labor are ak -- amtrak's partner. we -- if they so see the need but more importantly, the substantial amount of additional funds for amtrakings leagues. amtrak tray plays a role in financing our railroad retirement system. which is itself is funded pension that this committee and 2002 and 2001 reformed. changes in the federal treatment of amtrak suggest as -- such as significant funding cut or passenger rail privatization could jeopardize the solvent sei that effects railroad employees around the country. americans want a national inner city networking and amtrak is uniquely able to fill that need. highways and commercial aviation will not alone beat the nation's future transportation needs. the core nation of air and rail services should be mandated to free more air slots and provide timely rail services for shorter travel distances than
met a guy at yellowstone who worked for the public tv station in boston, retired from that job and had always wanted to be a park ranger. key couldn't beat out how to get there so we joined a student conservation association and ginger program. there wasn't anyone in his class over the age of 19. i met a woman in denver whose daughter had gone through teach for america and as she watched her daughter teach in a los angeles classroom she was so moved that she applied for teach for america herself. she was in her early 50's at the time and ended up a year later in a dorm room in july in houston at 115 degrees, sweltering temperature sharing a bathroom down the hall with three, 22-year-olds. it seem like whether they were burrowing up from the street or repelling down from the ceiling or sneaking in the side door there were more and more people who were trying to find these kind of pathways to purpose. we created at encore.org a fellowship, an encore fellowship program which was designed to be a front door for many people who wanted to make this passage. it started in silicon valley with
benjamin franklin is toddling around boston.ve you can imagine what that might've been like. when i was writing about franklin, i realized that a large part of the story was s consisto consist of franklin growing old. because he becamet america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. and i started writing about franklin when i was around 40i years old orbo so. i really wondered whether i wase going to be able to understando franklt was like to grow old. partly for this reason, i decided, and this has carried through in my other vote, i decideo te tell my story. i tried to relate the lives of mys, characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who saw them. people who knewperc them. kw my books tend to have more of eyewitness type stuff and some. if i others.ave if i have a choice between in mw writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody there, whole i willn tend to go towards the person who is was there. i think that conveys a certain authenticity. i will say that it relieves the burden of p
in the "washington post," "the boston globe," slate, the beirut daily star, san francisco magazine, "mother jones," and many, many others. eventually mr. jim and document a spectator and the daily car will be joining us and when he does i will give him a proper introduction. would the gentleman i have a right now i think a good way to get started, so those are three different perspectives, too represented here now, these are for philosophies in the midst of a campaign season, we are left and right and whatever is in between but i suppose that might be libertarian, dictator or influence on this election are outlined the american body politic. i think we should start with you individuals describing what it means to be a liberal. we will start with mr. scher. >> thanks very much for doing this. thank you for having us here. i've always defined liberalism very simply. the three r.'s of government. a government that is representative of all the people, that is responsive to the peoples concerned and is responsible of managing our resources both financial and natural. and that to me is the kind of gove
with a philadelphia investment accounting firm, cook and dealer was bought by a boston financial firm, united asset management which ed eventually ran. from there he became chairman and ceo of delaware investments, a mutual management co. and next he was called in to run putnam investments in boston, even larger mutual-fund management firm that has experienced regulatory failings by the previous management. he righted that ship and eventually sold a good price for shareholders to large canadian financial firm. it was at that time we approach ed to run freddie. freddie and fanny, together with broader issues of u.s. government in housing finance is one of the major unfinished pieces of business in financial regulatory reform. is clearly an important issue. we have c-span here tonight filming this. ed has a unique perspective, the perspective of an experienced manager on the frontline and a most thoughtful public policy participant. this evening he is going to talk about where the g s es have been and what to do with them. my great pleasure to introduce ed haldeman. [applause] >> thanks so much for t
near boston was fine, mama couldn't understand why they were calling. later that night when uncle louie finally got through, they gained some sense of the damage. he had had to leave his house and fight his way to the telephone office to get a line. all along main street big, old elms had fallen. the virgin pine forest in paradise was wrecked. that was an area of kind of unspoiled trees behind the house in windsor. it's now a beautiful park, but it no longer has these immense firs and pines that were there in the '30s. the virgin pine forest in paradise was wrecked. the woods, mama would say later, looked as if giants had been playing jack straws. everywhere ruined and paradise never again the same. that had been rob's personal family loss. it would be nearly two years more before all hell broke loose around the globe. so this is a digression. now we have to go back to egypt in 1942, but what was interesting in a way was what was about to happen to rob at this point was all hell was about to break loose for him. he would be moved to the front lines. he'd learned how to operate a wonderf
through on the old ideas that never seem to go anywhere. and he really has. i was on a panel in boston before the election with a guy named charlie baker who is a republican. he ran for governor in 2010 and got hasted by duval patrick here to see republican who lost that year. but he had read my book and he said his take away was to stuff, whether you're on the right or the left and i do think that is an implicit message of this book. i get asked all the time at events like this, how did obama screwed the politics about? how come people think the stimulus created jobs think that elvis is alive, which is actually true. it was first of all say that this black guy whose middle name is hussein and got himself elected of the united states probably didn't become a political on january 20, 2009, but he did this unbelievably unpopular stimulus. then he didn't even more on popular auto bailout. he didn't even more unpopular health care reform. meanwhile he's doing his controversial things in iraq, doing stuff in and, getting us into libya, and making statements about marriage. there's financial
is in chicago, and mitt romney in boston. we'll focus on the more competitive senate seats and taking reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter with live coverage beginning at eight eastern on c-span c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> when i watch c-span, i like the morning journal, the give and take there, the balanced approach, and i also like to hear the callers. never called myself, but i like hearing the callers. some of them are unusual to say the least, others thought provoking. c-span is everywhere. in washington, every event, you know, small hearings, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watching c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >>> up next, former presidential candidate ralph nader on his book "17 solutions: bold ideas for america's future" looking at the political and cosh -- landscape and issues facing the country. the independent candidate for president in 2004 and 2008 discusses tax reform, the reduction of the
has enough money to hire a new assistant and he hires a promising young man from boston and he teaches them how to be a journalist and report about slavery and the great irony they would want to die in obscurity and he would go on to become the most famous abolitionist editor and one of the most influential american journalists of the 19th book, too. you probably think the only important thing that he did in his life is write the lyrics to the star spangled banner. he went into an interesting career in politics which is completely unknown to most people she was the modern washington character after he became famous in 1814 for writing the star spangled banner he did what people in washington usually do and he parlayed his fame into a lucrative practice and the political connection into jobs in the of the culmination of francis scott key's in 1833 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time i wouldn't say that was as significant as right in the star spangled banner which was obviously an enduring bet but it was really important.
federal judges, including famously an appeals court judge to sit on the appeals court in boston who has been back, he's in portland, and he's been backed by both republican senators became as part of they call, what difficult? the thurman road which was -- >> the thurman leahy rule. spent the person to look to for some guidance here is a interesting, the senator-elect from maine. who was governor as an independent. you probably all know this by now but is coming to washington, claiming that he is his party installation, his party a lime is up for grabs. his initial request was that he would align with whichever party agreed to push for a essentially a doing away with the current filibuster rules. harry reid has made clear he's not going to go that far but we still think angus king will end up combining with the democrats. he did after all endorsed obama. >> and he said yesterday that he had several conversations with him in the past 24 hours. >> and the best he could do was get a phone call from bob corker. sounds like only one side is courting him. but the point being that it is, this
-- to deal with that is to say no, that is not to. we're in boston, we're in kuwait. we have 2000 mosques. i don't think a straight effective quite frankly. i think a much better approach is an approach which combined with the kind of things we do with exchange programs and other softer means, public diplomacy 2.0, to get to a point where people can believe that. that the pernicious belief. it's wrong but people can believe. it doesn't mean they will kill us. so those are the goals. it is a battle of ideas, but it's a battle of ideas that will take a long time to win. i do think and public diplomacy we sometimes forget the imports of that ideological struggle, which may be the most important of all. >> i think i would say it somewhat differently but you've heard me say earlier that i believe quite passionately that public diplomacy is there to ensure that everything we do that we achieve our foreign policy goals and objectives, which frankly very country to country, region to region. and so in some parts of the world, some of the struggles we've been talking about are higher than they are in
here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the price to post-9/11, is the sort of coming to grips with the hubris we could prevent bad things from happening, this huge investment in the post-secular world arabic ere we could ideally stop risk. actually coping with that is what we really need to increase and maybe just bring it very close to home. we just had this bashing mother nature in the area, priced at around $60 billion for a risk above the basic things like when you have tunnels that are only seven feet above water. it fills up the hole and you end up with 86 million gallons of oil in the tunnel and that's not hard to predict. putting safeguards in place in recovering this may be one element of this. basically the issue is that we focus too much on trying to prevent risk instead of managing it better? >> steve tried to argue for solace, which is an interesting concept. yes, back here. >> richard downey from the center for hemispheric u.s. david, you mentioned in the election t
e-mails, i am disappointed -- when i went to work for the mayor of boston i was told seriously there's one thing you got to remember. you have -- never talk when you can not and never not when you can wind. why these two intelligent men rescinding these embarrassing e-mails is baffling. did they not know, talk about white collar crime, that no one would be indicted if it would not for e-mails. i am sorry for the general david petraeus family. there does not appear to be any public policy relevance to this. i am sorry people are fussing over it. >> it is a major public policy f they cause -- do you think the democrats have a mandate to get that type of revenue through? when you look at this election -- >> and doing one part of the george bush tax cuts which were adopted after a president got a plurality of half a million votes. if-half a million give you a mandate to put the tax cuts in than 3.3 million plus ought to give you a mandate to put them out. >> how much of the president's vote the you think was about taxes and the argument that he made about higher taxes versus all of his o
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17